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The Story Behind The Song: Tritonal – Anchor (Noisestorm Remix)

noisestorm

Last month Noisestorm made his UKF debut…

Taking a little intermission from his heavy bass driven, complex music we’ve come to know and love him for, his remix of Tritonal’s Anchor is a much softer, summery feel. We reckon it’s almost impossible not to like it – but he’s had a few comments to suggest otherwise – we called him up to discover more…

“Enhanced Music approached me around July and asked me if I would be interested in doing a remix,” he explains. “I actually hadn’t even heard of Tritonal before the offer but I checked out the song and I really loved the vocals. Certain songs just have that vocal once you hear it you’re just kind of sold no matter what.”

There have been a few people saying this is generic or whatever. But it was kind of meant to be in a way. It was meant just to be a fun little drum & bass mix you throw on in the summer to just enjoy and I hope it came out that way.

It’s just meant to be fun

“It was never meant to be techy or complex like my other music. Especially my originals, they tend to be very heavy and complex and I spend months getting every detail right. But for this one I wanted to keep it simple and very vocal based. So the vocal took over most of the song and it’s simply based around that. Sometimes you have to let the vocals showcase themselves and build something to compliment them.

There have been a few people saying this is generic or whatever. But it was kind of meant to be in a way. It was meant just to be a fun little drum & bass mix you throw on in the summer to just enjoy and I hope it came out that way. It’s not too hectic or too crazy. A lot of my other music is really out there in how heavy it is, so this was a nice break.”

Vocals have to have meaning

“I love all kinds of music, heavy music, live music and especially vocal music. A lot of my tracks are instrumentals or they have tiny vocal snippets, but it was really nice to go all out and have a fully vocal tune for once.

I’d like to use more vocals in my work. But a lot of the time the vocals themselves aren’t exactly what I’m looking for and if I can find the right person that knows that and has the same ideals then maybe. It’s just so easy to become similar to everyone else if you go down the standard route and write the cliché lyrics. So it’s more about finding a unique person to work with.”

He’s got tons in store for 2015 

“Basically this past year I’ve been collecting and improving my production sound, spending a lot of time learning and finding out my unique sound because it’s very easy to get lost in what everyone else is doing. It’s so easy to produce, in a sense that anyone with a computer can do it, so you’ve got to find your own signature and that’s really important.

So I spent nearly the last two years focusing on that and my last two releases are nearly there in what I want to do. Next year I have around six originals and a few remixes and I’m really going to push things to the next level of what I want in terms of standard, and also in terms of style. A lot of my older songs have been generic in some ways and I don’t think they’ve been up to scratch in my opinion for production level. So next year is going to be really exciting, I’ll be rolling out new graphics as well… Tons of stuff coming in 2015!”

I think genres are restricting and the less people care about genres the more freedom people have. A set doesn’t have to be just one BPM, it can be many and you can enjoy it so much more just from having that broad spectrum.

Focus more on the music and less on the genre

“I’m trying to make myself as diverse as possible. I want to make music that’s not sticking to a certain BPM or a certain genre. I’m trying to forget all that and focus more on making a cohesive set of tracks that are all different and I want anyone to be able to listen. The Anchor remix is a good example because my other music is so heavy and then there’s this chill summery drum n bass mix in the middle of it. I want to be able to do that and not feel like I’m letting people down or feel like I have to produce a certain way.

I think genres are restricting and the less people care about genres the more freedom people have. A set doesn’t have to be just one BPM, it can be many and you can enjoy it so much more just from having that broad spectrum.

I stopped putting genre names on my SoundCloud and YouTube just for that reason. People tend to argue over what genre it is more than if they like the song or not.I have all this time now to focus on getting things to a new level of quality in every respect.”